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RTO Info

Changes to Register An RTO in 2018 – Part 5

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Become an RTO – Changes to register an RTO in 2018 – Part 5 of 6 (This is the 5th phase in the student’s journey).

RTO Audits - RTO consultants are fully qualified auditorsBecome an RTO – If you are considering applying to become an RTO there are a whole host of things you need to understand before you can make an informed decision about moving forward with your idea. IMPACT Workforce Training Group like to ur on the side of caution, particularly now The Regulator has made significant changes to the application process, (1st May 2018), which in our opinion, are game changes. The impact this will have on those wishing to become an RTO maybe far more thought provoking than you had originally considered. So, we have provided you with a glimpse of what you could expect in the form of a series of blogs that will take you through the phases.

This will be a road map, it will allow you to understand how robust the process to become an RTO is, and what you really need to have in place to ensure you will be approved at audit. This is part 5 of a 6 part update.

Last week we looked at Training and Assessment  – The 4th phase in the students journey.

This week we will look at Conclusion – The 5th phase in the student journey

CONCLUSION

This area focuses on ensuring certification is only issued to students who have completed all assessment requirements. Certification documentation must be issued in a timely manner and must be in a format prescribed by the standards.

In this phase we ask you to review your statement of attainment templates, as well as your proceses for issuing secure certification and a method to ensure defraud. System is in place.

Please consider and ask yourself these questions:

 

Yes No N/A
1.     Does your certification documentation include the name of the organisation, space for the RTO code and the NRT logo    
2.     Does your certification documentation use the NRT logo only in accordance with Schedule 4 of these standards    
3.     Do your Qualification testamurs include the code and title of any qualification      
4.     Your Qualification testamurs include (where applicable):

·            if required by a state/territory training authority, the relevant state/territory training authority logo the industry descriptor

·            the occupational or functional stream (in brackets)

·            if delivered through an apprenticeship program, the words ‘achieved through Australian Apprenticeship arrangements’

·            if training and assessment has been delivered in a language other than English, the words, ‘these units / modules have been delivered and assessed in [language]’

followed by a list of the relevant units/modules.

     
5.     Do your Statements of attainment include the code and title of all units/modules that have been completed      
6.     Do your Statements of attainment include a space for the authorised signatory      
7.     Do your Statements of attainment include the organisation’s seal, watermark or corporate identifier      
8.     Do your Statements of attainment include, where applicable:

·            if required by a state/territory training authority, the relevant state/territory training authority logo if the statement of attainment relates to part of an incomplete

qualification, rather than a standalone unit, the words ‘these competencies form part of [code and title of qualification(s)/course(s)]’

·            the words, ‘these competencies were attained in completion of [code] course in [full title]’

·            if training and assessment has been delivered in a language other than English, the words, ‘these units / modules have been delivered and assessed in [language]’ followed by a list of the relevant units/modules.

     
9.     Do your certification templates only refer to the unique student identifier (USI) in accordance with the Student Identifiers Act 2014.      
10.  Does your organisation has a system place to ensure all AQF Certification records will be registered and maintained for 30 years.      
11.  How long will the student have to wait before they receive their qualification or statement of attainment?      
12.  What is your systematic process from successful completion by a learner to their receipt of the certificate. Eg who is initially informed of successful completion, who will register the successful completion, who will print the certificate,  to the final sign off. (Axcerlerate)      
13.  Please read and understand the Student Identifiers Act 2014      
14.  Please read and understand the requirements for all certificate templates here: https://www.asqa.gov.au/news-publications/publications/fact-sheets/sample-aqf-documentation

 

     

We are more than happy to assist you!

www.impacworkforce.com.au

1330 933 037

Changes To Register An RTO in 2018 – Part 4

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Become an RTO – Changes to register an RTO in 2018 – Part 4 of 6 (This is the 4th phase in the student’s journey).

Setup an RTO

Training and Assessment

 

Become an RTO – If you are considering applying to become an RTO there are a whole host of things you need to understand before you can make an informed decision about moving forward with your idea. IMPACT Workforce Training Group like to ur on the side of caution, particularly now The Regulator has made significant changes to the application process, (presented on the 1st May 2018 but take effect 1st July 2018), which in our opinion, are game changes. The impact this will have on those wishing to become an RTO maybe far more thought provoking than you had originally considered. So, we have provided you with a glimpse of what you could expect in the form of a series of blogs that will take you through the phases.

This will be a road map, it will allow you to understand how robust the process to become an RTO is, and what you really need to have in place to ensure you will be approved at audit. This is part 4 of a 6 part update.

Last week we looked at Support & Progression – The 3rd phase in the students journey.

This week we will look at Training & Assessment – The 4th phase in the student journey.

TRAINING & ASSESSMENT

This area focuses on having training and assessment strategies in place, that include the amount of training to be provided for each training product you intend to deliver ensuring it is sufficient for the intended student cohort.

Training and assessment strategies (TAS) are your individual Business Plan/Road Map for the WHO, WHAT, WHERE, WHEN, HOW & WHY of how you plan to deliver and assess each program you intend to place on scope.

This area also focuses on your venue, facilities, resources and training staff. The expectation is that you will be ready to operate as a training provider on your very first contact with ASQA – on submit of your initial application.

Please consider and ask yourself these questions:

  1. Have you developed a training and assessment strategy (TAS) for all programs you intend to place on scope?
  2. Can you show evidence to support you have a market for your intended services?
  3. Can you show evidence you have consulted with industry to develop your TAS?
  4. Have you considered a holistic approach for the delivery of training, taking into consideration the differing skill levels you may have in your learner cohort? Eg basic, intermediate, advanced.
  5. Have you checked the nominal hours for each training product is consistent with the nationally agreed hours eg dtwd.wa.gov.au
  6. Have you considered all pre-requisites or entry requirements for each program Eg some UOC/Qualifications suggest there are no pre-requisites; be aware that whilst the training package may suggest such, consider everything: For example HLTAID003 suggests there are no pre-requisites, which is correct, however in order for a learner to enroll your entry requirements might well look something like this:  a.Learners will be required to provide their Learner Identifier number prior to the commencement of the course (usi.gov.au to register). b.Learners will be required to show a photo id on the day of course commencement. c. Learners will require sufficient language and literacy skills to write a report of an incident. d.Learners must have the necessary health and fitness to carry out the assessment requirements which are to; complete continuous 2 minutes of CPR on an adult manikin kneeling on the floor and 2 minutes of continuous CPR on an infant manikin. (Some learners may find the physical aspects of this training strenuous and will be asked to discuss any injuries or physical limitations, with the RTO staff prior to enrolment). e. Learners MUST complete pre-course reading and an online theory learning and assessment module (via an online portal) prior to attendance of the classroom phase of the course. (This is a mandatory requirement). f. Learners are required to wear comfortable and loose-fitting attire including; enclosed flat shoes, slacks and loose fitting shirt/t-shirt for both males and females.    
  1.  What will be your review process for the review and update of your training and assessment strategies? How will you do it, who will be involved, how often and what will be the process?
Register an RTO

Review your RTO requirements

  1. How will you gain information and feedback from industry on how you plan to run your programs?
  2. Can you provide feedback from a range of industry representatives and show how this has been incorporated into the development of your training and assessment strategies
  3. Does any Industry feedback confirm that training and assessment strategies and intended practices are relevant to current and (where possible) future industry needs.
  4. When you develop and review your TAS it may include, but not limited to, the following:
  • Current units/Qualifications -should include both core and electives
  • Pre-requite or entry requirements
  • Sequencing of delivery and assessment
  • Amount of training
  • Modes of delivery – variables for differing learner cohorts
  • Venue and address of training and assessment
  • Work placement if relevant
  • Target market
  • Rational
  • How assessment will be conducted, including assessment during work placement
  • Timing of assessment
  • Assessment resources – learning – human – physical
  • Possible pathways
  • Training package version and release date
  • Unit/Qualification descriptor
  • Dress code
  • RPL
  • Course outline
  • Assessment and evidence gathering techniques
  • Assessment details and processes
  • Assessment tools and resources
  • Assessment rules and appeal process
  • Reasonable adjustment methods
  • Training and assessment staff
  • Information provided to the leaner prior to course commencement
  • Certification
  • Feedback
  • Validation
  • Industry consultation
  • Infrastructure requirements

12. Have you unpacked the training package assessment requirements and met the requirements of the entire training product. On audit; we find,       and  ASQA would attest to this, 85% of assessment instruments do not meet audit or training package requirements, so this is a key area to focus on.

13. Have you contextualised the learning resources for each client cohort?

14. Have you considered resources and support systems for learners who are undertaking distance or online training?

15. If you plan to conduct training and assessment at a specific employer’s premises, is this recorded in a contractual agreement with the employer?

16. If you plan to conduct training in a venue other than your own, do you have written consent or a lease to confirm?

17. Have you obtained necessary council approval (if appropriate) for all premises to be used as educational facilities?

18. Is the venue large enough to support the amount of learners you will accommodate in training?

19. Have you considered that all assessments conducted in a simulated environment replicates the workplace and meets the training package requirements.

20. Do you have sufficient staff, who are qualified in the most current Certificate IV in Training and Assessment (TAE40116 or upgrade by April 2019) and hold the relevant (or higher) qualifications/UOC they will deliver against.

21. Have you confirmed access to sufficient educational and support services to cover the amount of learners?

22. Is there a requirement to undertake work placement or workplace supervision, if so is there  how will you accommodate this process? How will you determine sufficient and appropriately skilled staff are available at the workplace venue to supervise, train and if necessary provide assessment advice for the number and type of learners?

23. Have you unpacked the training package to ensure you have all the relevant resources required to deliver and assess the product eg working at heights would require the use of an elevated platform.

This gives you an idea.

I think that’s a lot to consider for Part 4. More next week.

Call us now to assist you to Become an RTO on 1300 933 037

We would love to help! www.impactworkforce.com.au

 

Changes To Register An RTO in 2018 – Part 3

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Becoem an RTO

The 3rd phase of the students journey

Become an RTO – Changes to register an RTO in 2018 – Part 3 of 6 (This is the 3rd phase in the student’s journey).

Become an RTO – If you are considering applying to become an RTO there are a whole host of things you need to understand before you can make an informed decision about moving forward with your idea. IMPACT Workforce Training Group like to ur on the side of caution, particularly now The Regulator has made significant changes to the application process, (1st May 2018), which in our opinion, are game changes. The impact this will have on those wishing to become an RTO maybe far more thought provoking than you had originally considered. So, we have provided you with a glimpse of what you could expect in the form of a series of blogs that will take you through the phases.

This will be a road map, it will allow you to understand how robust the process to become an RTO is, and what you really need to have in place to ensure you will be approved at audit. This is part 3 of a 6 part update.

Last week we looked at Enrolment  – The 2nd phase in the students journey.

This week we will look at Support and Progression – The 3rd phase in the student journey

SUPPORT & PROGRESSION

This area focuses on how you will support student’s progression in their learning by supporting students, keeping students informed and managing complaints and appeals.

  • You will need to provide details of the staff members that will provide support services within your proposed RTO.
  • You will also need to provide details of any external organisations that you may have engaged or will engage to provide support services.
  • You must be able to demonstrate you have training and assessment strategies and resources in place to identify any support needs and have the arrangements and capacity to make this support available to learners.
  • Your complaints and appeals policy and processes responds to allegations involving the conduct of The RTO, its trainers, assessors or other staff, a 3rd party or another learner
  • Your complaints policy is publicly available

Support needs may include, LLN support, disability or physical concerns, cultural, socioeconomic, family issues, limitations on access to resources.

LLN support may include, assistive technology, extra tutorials or teaching support, access to resources owned by the organisation, such as computers or wi-fi, counsellors/mediation services.

Please consider and ask yourself these questions:

  1. How will you notify the student of any agreed services that may change? Eg change to an existing 3rd party, how will you notify the student and by what means?
  1. How will you record, acknowledge and deal with complaints and appeals? How will you ensure they are dealt with efficiently and effectively?
  1. What is your appeals policy to manage requests for a review of decisions including assessment decisions?
  1. Do you have an already developed; Complaints Policy, Complaints Form, Complaints Register?
  1. What processes are in place to identify individual students support needs?
  1. How will you identify student support needs at the time of enrolment? What documents, methodologies, processes will you use?
  1. How will you continue to identify student needs as the learner progresses through the training process?
  1. Who will be responsible within the RTO as an internal point of contact for student support? What is their position in the company and what will their support role be eg providing counselling etc
  1. What relationships with to external support services have been established/will be established (where the organisation is not equipped to provide that support)?
  1. What system is in place that provides staff with up-to-date and relevant links to internal and external support services.
  1. What support services are relevant to the student cohort and are accessible for all modes of delivery offered
  1. What sort of support services have been identified as needed by the students in your intended enrolment cohort?
  1. How have support services, including external support services, been identified and sourced to support those needs?
  1. What information about support services have you provided in your Training and Assessment Strategy?
  1. How will you contextualize your training and assessment resources to accommodate for individual support needs or your learners?
  1. What are your timelines to conclude a complaint within the RTO?
  1. Do you have a separate Complaints and Appeals process or are both combined into one?

Part 3 complete.

More next week.

Call us now to assist you to Become an RTO on 1300 933 037

We would love to help! www.impactworkforce.com.au

 

Changes to Register An RTO in 2018 – Part 2

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RTO Enrolment

RTO Enrolment

 

Become an RTO – Changes to register an RTO in 2018 – Part 2 of 6 (This is the 2nd phase in the student’s journey).

Become an RTO – If you are considering applying to become an RTO there are a whole host of things you need to understand before you can make an informed decision about moving forward with your idea. IMPACT Workforce Training Group like to ur on the side of caution, particularly now The Regulator has made significant changes to the application process, (1st May 2018), which in our opinion, are game changes. The impact this will have on those wishing to become an RTO maybe far more thought provoking than you had originally considered. So, we have provided you with a glimpse of what you could expect in the form of a series of blogs that will take you through the phases.

This will be a road map, it will allow you to understand how robust the process to become an RTO is, and what you really need to have in place to ensure you will be approved at audit. This is part 2 of a 6 part update.

Last week we looked at Marketing and Recruitment – The first phase in the students journey.

This week we will look at Enrolment – The second phase in the student journey

ENROLMENT

As part of the enrolment process RTOs are responsible for informing and protecting students, protecting pre-paid fees by students, and providing credit for prior studies. It ensures  accurate advice is provided about a course to ensure it meets the needs before enrolment; that the student can understand all details associated with the course, their rights and obligations to make a more informed decision prior to enrolment.

We ask you to consider and ask yourself the following questions:

  1. Does your pre-enrolment information or enrolment agreement include the code, title and currency of the training product the student is or may be enrolled in as set out on training.gov.au?
  2. Does your pre-enrolment information include the expected duration time? (in all modes of delivery)
  3. Does your pre-enrolment information state all training and assessment locations? (all venues and delivery sites)
  4. Does your pre-enrolment information state all the delivery modes (a mix of delivery modes is required to accommodate for differing learner cohorts and experience levels)
  5. Does your pre-enrolment information state all work placement arrangements?
  6. Does your pre-enrolment information include information about any third-party arrangements for the delivery of the training and assessment and the contact details for the third parties. (only required if a 3rd party is utilized – Should you use a 3rd party to deliver your services, a robust 3rd party agreement should be developed and included on all enrolment information).
  7. Does your pre-enrolment information include information about educational and support services available to students: Considerations should include, developing an LLN Checklist/Test, Student Handbook, Support Services Policy, Code of Practice?
  8. Does your pre-enrolment information include information on potential implications for students accessing training subsidies or entitlement programs?
  9. Does your pre-enrolment information clearly state the organisation’s responsibilities to the students, including that the training organisation must; provide quality training and assessment, comply with the Standards for RTOs 2015, issue AQF certification?
  10. Does your pre-enrolment information include information on the rights of students, including; a complaints and appeals process, requiring a Complaints and Appeals Policy, Complaints and Appeals Register, Complaints and Appeals Form, a Complaints & Appeals Flowchart may be developed as an easy overview to educate your proposed staff on the process. Your Code of Practice should include this information, your Complaints & Appeals Policy should be placed on your website.
  11. Inability to deliver services – What happens if your organisation or a third party is unable to deliver the training and assessment? (What is your mechanism to safeguard this option?, what is your proposed RTO policy on your training and service guarantee, should a 3rd party not fulfill the service, the RTO closes or the RTO ownership changes hands?). Develop a Training Guarantee Policy, which should also be addressed, in part, in your Code of Practice
  12. Resources and Work placements – The pre-enrolment information or enrolment agreement includes information on resources and work placements including; anything a student needs to enrol in and complete the training and assessment (such as resources they will need to supply eg PPE, notepads, pens), whether students are required to source their own work placements (make it clear if work placements are required and who is responsible for sourcing, a comprehensive 3rd party/workplace supervisor agreement should be developed if this option is required).
  13. Does your organisation have a process for assessing whether each training product is appropriate for potential students. This includes if the mode of delivery is suitable for the students needs, if the level of the training product is appropriate for the students existing skills and abilities (Basic, intermediate or advanced skill level should be considered).
  14. Fees and refunds should address – all relevant fees a student will need to pay over the term of their enrolment, payment plan options, payment terms and conditions, including deposits and timeframes for payment (an RTO upfront learner fee threshold is $1,500, total fees can be taken but measures need to be in place for protection of fees. Payment plans may be considered as another option in this area).
  15. Refund terms and conditions, including if the student initiates the termination of enrolment, or the RTO is unable to provide the agreed services (Development of a refund policy including under what circumstances substantiate a refund and how administratively this will be affected).
  16. Learners’ rights as consumers including cooling-off periods. (A cooling off clause should be evident in your Learner Rights Policy).
  17. Fee and refund information considerations – What will your refund policy look like, what fees will be paid upfront, what happens on a cancellation of a course, what is the mechanism should a student be unable to complete a course due date, what circumstances will you consider a refund will be granted?
  18. Credit Transfer – who will authenticate AQF certification documentation from another RTO? What information will be presented to learners on this subject and what documents will it be included in? – eg Code of Practice, Enrolment Agreement)

Part 2 complete.

More next week.

Call us now to assist you to Become an RTO on 1300 933 037

We would love to help! www.impactworkforce.com.au

 

Start Up Costs To Become An RTO

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Start-up costs to become an RTO

RTO Start Up Costs

RTO Start Up Costs

Start up costs to become an RTO – One of the foremost issues for those planning to set up an RTO is cost. How much will it cost for a consultant to assist me, how much for my resources, staff, operations, application, insurances and on-going fees. So lets provide you with a few insights into the key cost factors to consider:

Initial Considerations:

  • Consulting fees – start from $5,000 which can cover everything from attending registration audit, policy development, procedures, forms, course information, training and assessment strategies and development of all course-ware for delivery and assessment of your courses and programs.
  • Student management system – approximately $2,000
  • Learning management system – approximately $1,000 – only required if you are planning to deliver online courses
  • Venues for training – Varies depending on location and size of premises
  • Staff & Trainers – Can vary depending on the requirements and needs
  • Materials and equipment – Can vary depending on the course or training package
  • Application Lodgement Fee – $800 (Paid to the governing body eg ASQA)
  • Application Risk Assessment – $8,000 (Paid to the governing body eg ASQA)
  • Public liability insurance – from $1,000
  • Website development – from $800
  • Accounting fees – from $2,000
  • Marketing & Advertising – Can vary dependent on medium used

Annual Charges:

  • Annual registration fee – $1,130 (for up to 4 qualifications on scope, paid to the governing body eg ASQA)

The above are indicative costs only and may vary significantly so its a good idea to have an initial consult with a specialist RTO consultancy firm first.  Most consultancy forms will offer you free consultation to at least steer you in the right direction and answer any initial questions you may have.   RTO consultants used to be a rare find, and those who went down the consultancy road had in fact owned and operated their own RTOs, were all auditors themselves, experienced learning and development specialists, with many many years in vocational education and training, now there seems to be many to choose from, including the scam artists, so our recommendations are buyer beware……………we ask you to choose wisely!  Make contact; see what feels right for you and dig deep about their experience, skills and background.

Whilst the above list of fees and charges can seem a little overwhelming, the benefits of becoming an RTO can far outweigh the costs, but we understand why you may be hesitant to take this step. Contact our expert team today to find out more about how we can help you register your RTO – you can reach us on 1300 933 037 or visit our website now.

Why Use Our RTO Consulting Services?

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RTO consultancy

Why use our services

Why Use Our RTO Consulting Services? – IMPACT Workforce Training Group offer a wide range of information and services in the Education, Training, Learning and Development field, particularly for RTOs or people looking to become one.  We have over 25 years experience in ownership, management, business development and training in the VET and RTO field providing no fuss, professional down to earth consultants that want to see you thrive.

We offer our services 7 days a week for your convenience, on hand to chat with you openly on an obligation free discussion.

Our RTO consulting services include: (click on the titles to take you to the pages for more comprehensive information)

New RTO Registration

Starting up your own RTO is a comprehensive, complicated and challenging task – we know, we’ve done it quite a times over the years and want to help you with a no fuss and streamlined approach.

Audit Rectifications

So you’ve  just had an audit and you have a number of non-compliance areas you have to rectify. Knowing you have only 20 days to fix and address all non-compliance items and respond to ASQA’s report, you feel a little overwhelmed at completing a post audit rectification. IMPACT Workforce Training Group can help you rectify the non-compliance issues and provide the evidence report to respond to ASQA, quickly and effectively.

This RTO post audit rectification service is designed to provide an RTO with the help they need to fix non-compliance requirements quickly and effectively.

Validation

Validations are a key process in the maintenance and compliance of your RTO, allow us to assist you in this necessary requirements.

External Auditing Services and Audit Assistance

Let us assist with your registration, post-registration or re-registration audits. Get everything from advice to full scale rectification.

Compliance Advice and Support

Not sure of your obligations under the Standards for Registered Training Organisations 2015 and other relevant legislation? Get advice and support on all compliance related matters by our specialist team.

RTO Management

Need a business plan for your RTO registration? Not sure of strategies, policies and procedures or approaches to RTO management? Contact us for assistance.

Extensions to Scope

You have been an RTO for some time, your market is changing and requires further pathways for your clients so your thinking of increasing your RTO scope. We can provide all services needed for extensions to scope, including writing your initial units and full qualifications, preparing your TAS and completing your application.

Policies & Procedures

We provide a complete set of RTO specific policies and procedures, ready to go, call us for more infofrmation.

Specialist RTO Consultants

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Specialist RTO Consultants

Gain assistance from specialist RTO consultants in any area of RTO operations, the Standards for RTOs 2015, audits, initial RTO registration, RTO policies and procedures, RTO transfer of ownership, becoming an RTO, extensions to scope, RTO compliance, development of training resources to RTO validations and staff recruitment.

We have over 25 years experience in ownership, operations, management, business development, training, education, learning and development, compliance and validation in the VET and RTO field.  Gaining expertise in a vast array of differing industries we have the capability to assist in any area, for any industry, on anything ‘RTO’.

If you are looking for an RTO consultant with a very broad level of knowledge of the entire life cycle of an RTO, and everything in between, our professional team will guide you every step of the way. No job is too big or small for our team! Talk to us for an obligation free discussion now.

Contact us today: admin@impactworkforce.com.au or call us on 1300 933 037

RTO Consultants

Specialist RTO Consultants

 

IMPACT Workforce Training Group Open 7 Days A Week

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Education, Training, Learning & Development Specialists for RTOs, or those wishing to become one

IMPACT Workforce Training Group open 7 days a week providing a national service 24 hours a day for your convenience.

These days everyone seems ‘time poor’ so the requirement to offer a service that is available 7 days a week 24 hours a day is important.

Our services cover a wide range of information and services in the Education, Training, Learning and Development field, particularly for RTOs or people looking to become one.  We have over 25 years experience in ownership, management, business development and training in the VET RTO field.

Allow us to assist you, anytime, anywhere in Australia.

Call us now on 1300 933 037

 

Collection of assessment evidence by a workplace supervisor

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Assessment collection

Collection of assessment evidence by a third party workplace supervisor, how do we achieve? 

Collection of evidence by a workplace supervsior

To inform a judgement about whether a learner has achieved competency, a registered training organisation (RTO) must gather a range of evidence of the learner’s competence. In some cases, an assessor from The RTO cannot directly gather all the required evidence that supports a competency judgement. In these cases, the evidence may be gathered or reported by other people. This type of evidence is categorised as supplementary/supporting evidence gathered and provided by a supervisor in the learners workplace.

This can be an onerous responsibility from a workplace supervisors point of view, therefore the RTO should take effective measures to ensure the third party affecting this process is aware of their roles and responsibilities in the process.

We can talk to you about the rules of evidence and the principles of assessment until the cows come home but really what is it that you require to consider when establishing evidence gathering from another party, workplace supervisor or such.  The following provides a guide to follow to ensure you may have a more reliable approach to your evidence gathering requirements from another party.

What to consider when using evidence collected by other parties

  • Firstly your RTO should first determine that it is appropriate to involve another party in the collection of evidence.
  • Selecting the best person to collect the evidence. The appropriate person to observe or report on the performance of the learner is someone who is in a position to make a valid comment on the learner’s performance, for example, a workplace supervisor/manager. An effective face to face screening process may be considered at this point. (Work on a minimum of 3 years industry experience).
  • Verifying the other party’s industry skills, vocational competence and qualifications. This can be completed via the face to face screening process.
  • Providing quality materials for the collection of evidence. Develop an extensive assessment instrument that includes a judgement tool and bench marking requirements.
  • Providing the other party with a comprehensive agreement outlining the roles and responsibilities in the evidence gathering process. This includes providing clear guidance and instructions on who, what, where, when and how the evidence should be collected. eg A structured supervisor report and observation checklist.
  • Providing the other party with the appropriate training package information. Units of competency and modules describe work outcomes. Each of these units/modules describes, a specific work activity, the conditions under which this work activity is conducted, and the evidence that may/must be gathered in order to determine whether the activity is being performed in a competent manner. This is a vital component for the other party to understand as Training package information is written to guide assessors and the language is sometimes complex. Therefore, the behaviours and/or knowledge that the other party is being asked to collect evidence in must be ‘interpreted’.
  • Setting authenticity requirements. The other party should be advised that the setting of requirements for assessors to confirm that evidence is the candidate’s own work. Where another party is involved in the collection of evidence, there should be instructions for assessors on how to verify this evidence to ensure it is a true and accurate reflection of the candidate’s skills.
  • Confirming the other party understands their role in the process. This should be confirmed when, and only when, the RTO is assured the other party has the relevant experience, skills, competence and attitude to collect the evidence.

Remember, if an agreement has been reached with another party to collect evidence to complement other evidence gathered by the assessor, it is still the role of the assessor (The RTO) responsible to make the judgement about whether competency has been achieved.

 

Notes for all RTOs ,if the use of supplementary evidence is your only and primary source of evidence your RTO may wish to review your processes and practices.

Further information on the creation and development of other party and third party agreements can be discussed with one of our team. Email us at admin@impactworkforce.com.au  for more information.

Rules of Evidence

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Rules of Evidence

So what are the rules of evidence anyway!

It’s really not good enough to just collect any old evidence. Just as the way we collect evidence is guided by the principles of assessment, the way we collect evidence is guided by the rules of evidence.

Rule Evidence must…
Valid – Address the elements and performance criteria
– Reflect the skills, knowledge and context described in the competency standard
– Demonstrate the skills and knowledge are applied in real or simulated workplace situations
Current – Demonstrate the candidate’s current skills and knowledge
– Comply with current standards
Sufficient – Demonstrate competence over a period of time
– Demonstrate competence that is able to be repeated
– Comply with language, literacy and numeracy levels which match
– those required by the work task (not beyond)
Authentic – Be the work of the candidate
– Be able to be verified as genuine

To better understand how these rules affect the way that we assess, let’s have a look at each one in more detail.

Validity

The assessor is assured that the learner has the skills, knowledge and attributes as described in the module or unit of competency and associated assessment requirements.  Validity is assured when the performance required matches the performance described in a competency standard.

Currency

The assessor is assured that the assessment evidence demonstrates current competency. This requires the assessment evidence to be from the present or the very recent past.  Currency means evidence needs to be checked to ensure it shows recent performance.

Sufficiency

The assessor is assured that the quality, quantity and relevance of the assessment evidence enables a judgement to be made of a learner’s competency.

A judgement has to be made concerning how much evidence to call for. How much is required for the assessor to accept the performance as competent? Too little evidence risks the assessment not being reliable; too much leads to waste of time and effort.

Authenticity

The assessor is assured that the evidence presented for assessment is the learner’s own work.

Authenticity means evidence needs to be checked to ensure it actually relates to the performance of the person being assessed, and not that of another person. Checking for authenticity is important when some supplementary sources of evidence are used in assessment.

Supplying the Evidence

It is very easy to get too much evidence. It is also very easy to get too much evidence that doesn’t really help us to make good decisions. Because of this, it is in everyone’s interests to guide our learners through the selection, organisation and submission of evidence.

The first thing we need to do, however, is work out what makes quality evidence. The answer to this is quite simple. It is evidence that lets us make decisions about whether someone can do what it is that they are meant to be able to do, ie, it will help us to recognise competency.

Specifically, quality evidence addresses the rules of evidence as described above and:

  • reflects the skills, knowledge and attributes defined in the relevant unit of competency
  • shows application of the skills in the context described in the range statement in the unit of competency
  • demonstrates competence over a period of time
  • demonstrates repeatable competence
  • is the work of the candidate
  • can be verified
  • demonstrates the candidate’s current skills and knowledge
  • does not require language, literacy and numeracy levels beyond those needed for the performance of the competency.

The Portfolio Approach

Just as one size does not fit all with learning styles, neither will a single assessment method always provide the evidence that we need to make a decision about performance across all elements within a competency standard, or across several units of competency.

For this reason, it is common to prepare a range of types of evidence. This is called a portfolio. While we will need to target the contents of each portfolio to the specific context and purpose of the assessment, each will usually include the following:

  • contact details
  • a declaration that the evidence is the candidate’s own work
  • experience gained (work-based experiences)
  • units claimed
  • unit applications (including self-assessment form, cover page for evidence, assessor report form).

The Co-Assessing Approach

We are often better off to involve other people in the assessment event. These might be people who have a better understanding of the work-based knowledge and skills that we are seeking to recognise in our assessment. People who work closer to the “coal-face” are often able to help us see opportunities to assess several competencies in an integrated way.

Commonly, the people who will know the job the best are:

  • the learner themselves
  • supervisors and managers
  • technical and industry specialists
  • other assessors with experience in the area

From our conversations with these people, we might identify opportunities to better integrate the assessment activities. Doing this is a good idea, and for a number of reasons:

  • it gets rid of repetition across assessment activities
  • it tailors assessment so that it is more like what really happens at work
  • it saves everyone’s time